Posts Tagged ‘BACON’

Would people like RBI better if they worked like this?

Thursday, November 15th, 2012

Stats people and sabrmetric followers have a long history of not really like the RBI stat. Most people probably realize now that getting big numbers in RBIs has as much to do with being in the right spot in the batting order, and getting lots of opportunities with runners on base as it has to do with any particular skill at hitting. At least that’s how the theory goes. But what if we really wanted to know which players are best at driving in runs? You could look at splits like OPS with runners in scoring position, but OPS doesn’t consider a sacrifice fly to be a positive contribution, even though there are most likely some cases where batters step to the plate trying to hit a long fly ball, that will at worst be a sacrifice fly. I like the idea of trying to measure how successful the batter is at the thing the batter is trying to do, and I think driving in runs is one of those things a batter is trying to do more often than not. OBP measures what batters are trying to do some of the time. Slugging percentage usually doesn’t, or more batters would be trying to stretch hits into doubles and triples.
So how can we measure how well batters drive in runs after we already know some batters get a lot more opportunities than others? It’s not that big a mystery – measure the success against the opportunities. For example, Buster Posey had 20 plate appearances with no outs and a runner on third. The runner on third scored as a result of 16 of those plate appearances. That’s the most in both those categories. Obviously he never would have driven in 16 runners from 3rd base if he hadn’t had 20 opportunities, but how often does a runner on third score league wide? 53.9% of the time. There were 2709 plate appearances in 2012 with a runner on 3rd and no outs, and the runner on 3rd scored on 1459 times. So if average batters had been in those positions 20 times, instead of Buster Posey, only 10.78 runs would have been driven in from 3rd. So Posey was 48% better at driving in runners from third than the league average.
Using that same method, we can put an expected RBI value on each runner on base for every plate appearance for every batter. Add up the RBIs, add up the expected RBIs and divide actual by expected to see which batters are the best at driving in runs. (Ignoring the scoring decisions where the runner scored with no rbi awarded, because that just confuses things)
Here are the weights for each runner, based on what actually happened in 2012:

Outs Batter Runner on 1st Runner on 2nd Runner on 3rd
0 0.029 0.050 0.133 0.539
1 0.026 0.048 0.147 0.484
2 0.026 0.052 0.170 0.221

As you can see, batters scored on about 3% of plate appearance regardless of how many outs there were in the inning, and the number of outs don’t matter much to how often runners on 1st score. But runners on 2nd base have a slight advantage with 2 outs, and runners on 3rd obviously score less often with 2 outs because the sacrifice is no longer an option.  To get the expected RBI for each plate appearance, just got to the right number of outs, and add up the value in the chart based on what bases have runners.  Batting with 1 out and none on base gives a value of .026.  Batting with no outs and runners on 1st and 3rd gives an expected RBI value of .618.  If we add those all up for a player’s entire season, we can see who had the most opportunities to drive in runs.

You probably won’t be shocked to hear that Miguel Cabrera finished first in expected RBI in the American League – the situations he batted in this year add up to 88.38 from the base runner values above.  Basically, if an average batter hit in all the situations Cabrera hit in this year, the average batter would have driven in about 88 runs.  But Cabrera drove in 139 runs, so he was about 57% better at driving in runs.  His RBI/eRBI is 1.572.

On the other hand, Hunter Pence finished first in expected RBI in the nation league, with 94.1.  Pence batted with 541 runners on base during his plate appearances, and 281 of them were in scoring position.  Cabrera only had 248 runners in scoring position when he batted.  And the results for Pence were only 105 actual RBI.  His RBI/eRBI is 1.116, telling us he’s only 11.6% better than average for driving in runs.  But he’s still above average.  Pence’s world series teammate and playoff hero Marco Scutaro wasn’t quite so effective in the regular season.  His plate appearances add up to 80.5 expected RBI, but he only drove in 74 runs.  That puts his RBI/eRBI at only 0.920.  But he made up for it in the postseason.

RBI/eRBI is kind of a weird thing to write – and since I already have home-made stats named Bacon, SPAM, HAM, and PORK, it’s only logical that this stat be name Spare Rib to fit into the suite of sabermeatrics.

Anyway, here’s this 2012 Spare Rib leaders for players with over 500 plate appearances:

Batter Actual RBI Expected RBI Spare Rib
Josh Hamilton 128 79.246 1.615
Edwin Encarnacion 110 69.16 1.591
Miguel Cabrera 139 88.385 1.573
Garrett Jones 86 58.042 1.482
Ryan Braun 112 75.817 1.477
Alfonso Soriano 108 73.623 1.467
Chris Davis 85 58.368 1.456
Giancarlo Stanton 86 59.86 1.437
Mark Trumbo 95 67.5 1.407
Allen Craig 91 64.852 1.403
Curtis Granderson 106 77.257 1.372
Mike Trout 83 61.122 1.358
Yoennis Cespedes 82 60.409 1.357
Adrian Gonzalez 108 80.093 1.348
Prince Fielder 108 80.531 1.341
Chase Headley 115 85.829 1.34
Adam Dunn 96 71.821 1.337
Aramis Ramirez 105 78.732 1.334
Billy Butler 107 80.565 1.328
Miguel Montero 88 66.551 1.322
Andrew McCutchen 96 73.317 1.309
Torii Hunter 92 70.426 1.306
Matt Wieters 83 64.251 1.292
A.J. Pierzynski 77 59.683 1.29
Cody Ross 81 62.833 1.289
Dayan Viciedo 78 60.8 1.283
Jason Kubel 90 70.269 1.281
Adrian Beltre 103 81.057 1.271
Yadier Molina 76 60.128 1.264
Josh Willingham 110 87.182 1.262
Alex Rios 91 72.16 1.261
Albert Pujols 104 82.937 1.254
Ryan Zimmerman 95 75.888 1.252
Ike Davis 90 72.038 1.249
Carlos Beltran 97 77.675 1.249
Ian Desmond 73 58.537 1.247
Kendry Morales 73 58.78 1.242
Pedro Alvarez 85 68.849 1.235
Adam LaRoche 100 81.282 1.23
Andre Ethier 89 72.722 1.224
Chris Johnson 76 62.111 1.224
Nelson Cruz 90 73.625 1.222
David Wright 93 76.335 1.218
Matt Holliday 102 83.995 1.214
Buster Posey 103 85.041 1.211
Kyle Seager 86 71.294 1.206
Jay Bruce 99 82.123 1.206
Nick Swisher 93 77.231 1.204
Kevin Youkilis 60 50.034 1.199
Adam Jones 82 68.461 1.198
Corey Hart 83 69.645 1.192
Mark Reynolds 69 58.989 1.17
Carlos Gonzalez 85 72.715 1.169
Aaron Hill 85 72.874 1.166
Paul Goldschmidt 82 70.688 1.16
Mark Teixeira 84 72.887 1.152
Neil Walker 69 59.902 1.152
Colby Rasmus 75 65.386 1.147
Frederick Freeman 93 81.712 1.138
Robinson Cano 93 81.858 1.136
Jason Heyward 82 72.658 1.129
B.J. Upton 78 69.316 1.125
Jimmy Rollins 68 60.597 1.122
David Freese 79 70.492 1.121
David Murphy 61 54.522 1.119
Paul Konerko 75 67.155 1.117
Hunter Pence 105 94.099 1.116
Coco Crisp 46 41.692 1.103
Mike Moustakas 73 66.18 1.103
Hanley Ramirez 91 82.563 1.102
Ben Zobrist 74 67.306 1.099
Josh Reddick 85 78.802 1.079
Mike Aviles 60 56.568 1.061
Michael Saunders 57 53.931 1.057
Dan Uggla 79 75.047 1.053
Alexei Ramirez 73 69.646 1.048
Ryan Doumit 75 72.213 1.039
Austin Jackson 66 64.214 1.028
Brandon Phillips 77 74.931 1.028
Joe Mauer 85 82.774 1.027
Delmon Young 74 72.594 1.019
Martin Prado 72 70.816 1.017
Howie Kendrick 67 65.913 1.016
Melky Cabrera 60 59.215 1.013
Bryce Harper 59 58.454 1.009
Gordon Beckham 60 59.78 1.004
Starlin Castro 78 77.791 1.003
Brett Lawrie 48 47.925 1.002
Jason Kipnis 77 77.006 1
Dexter Fowler 53 53.327 0.994
Justin Morneau 77 77.818 0.989
Carlos Santana 76 76.835 0.989
Dustin Pedroia 65 65.971 0.985
Asdrubal Cabrera 66 67.064 0.984
Carlos Lee 77 79.143 0.973
Alberto Callaspo 53 54.493 0.973
Dan Murphy 65 66.874 0.972
Ian Kinsler 72 74.416 0.968
Jhonny Peralta 63 65.334 0.964
J.J. Hardy 68 70.579 0.963
Brennan Boesch 54 56.135 0.962
Kelly Johnson 55 58.356 0.942
Alejandro De Aza 50 53.206 0.94
Jordan Pacheco 54 57.767 0.935
Shin-Soo Choo 67 71.905 0.932
Jesus Montero 62 66.984 0.926
Justin Upton 67 72.44 0.925
Eric Hosmer 61 66.001 0.924
Carlos Pena 61 66.299 0.92
Marco Scutaro 74 80.46 0.92
Alex Gordon 72 78.988 0.912
Casey Kotchman 55 60.498 0.909
A.J. Ellis 52 58.018 0.896
Drew Stubbs 40 44.925 0.89
Michael Young 67 75.903 0.883
Alex Rodriguez 57 64.64 0.882
Justin Smoak 51 57.89 0.881
David DeJesus 50 56.999 0.877
Omar Infante 53 60.518 0.876
Michael Bourn 57 65.847 0.866
Norichika Aoki 50 58.624 0.853
Yonder Alonso 62 72.926 0.85
Desmond Jennings 47 55.983 0.84
Danny Espinosa 56 67.105 0.835
Michael Brantley 60 72.563 0.827
Elvis Andrus 62 75.18 0.825
Derek Jeter 58 70.73 0.82
Rafael Furcal 48 58.907 0.815
Angel Pagan 56 69.607 0.805
Ichiro Suzuki 55 68.397 0.804
Jose Reyes 57 70.958 0.803
Jeff Francoeur 49 61.4 0.798
Denard Span 41 51.44 0.797
Rickie Weeks 63 79.094 0.797
Yunel Escobar 51 64.601 0.789
Jon Jay 40 51.324 0.779
Shane Victorino 55 70.878 0.776
Dustin Ackley 50 64.597 0.774
Darwin Barney 44 58.258 0.755
Erick Aybar 45 60.046 0.749
Alcides Escobar 52 72.829 0.714
Jose Altuve 37 52.522 0.704
Zack Cozart 35 49.957 0.701
Cameron Maybin 45 64.896 0.693
Jamey Carroll 40 60.084 0.666
Ben Revere 32 55.833 0.573
Ruben Tejada 25 45.109 0.554
Jemile Weeks 20 47.026 0.425

You can see right in the middle there, it turns out Jason Kipnis is that average batter I was talking about above. The runners on base when he batted scored at pretty much exactly the same rate as the major league average.

It turns out managers are pretty good at getting their players who are best at driving in runs into the middle of the order – here’s what the Spare Rib totals look like by batting order position:
4th – 1.154
3rd – 1.138
5th – 1.114
6th – 1.002
7th – 0.969
2nd – 0.931
8th – 0.837
1st – 0.831
9th – 0.652

ranking loogys

Thursday, August 30th, 2012

Baseball, and especially pitching, is more and more about specialization, and the most specialized case for pitchers are the left-handers who are brought in to face just one batter. The Loogys. The problem with this kind of specialization is that conventional pitching stats are kind of useless for guys like this. Who cares how many earned runs per 9 innings a guy gives up, when you only use him for one batter per game? And how fair is it to measure his walks plus hits per inning pitched, when in most of his appearances he’s either giving up a walk, a hit, or pitching one third of an inning. And even more unfair is that very often these guys are sent out to face one of the toughest outs in the opposing lineup.
So what we need is, a stat that combines whether or not they got the batter out, and how hard that is to do. I call this stat PORK, for pitchers out risk classification. (It’s not a perfect acronym). To start with, we need to figure out how hard it is to get each batter out. I’m simply using each batter’s outs per plate appearance rate. Then, I need to figure out how much it should be worth to a pitcher to get each batter out. To do that, I take the batter’s outs per plate appearance, and divide it by the league average, and take the reciprocal, so guys who make outs less often than league average will be above one, worse batters will be below one, and if someone makes outs at exactly the league average, they’re just worth 1. Through August 29th, getting Andrew McCutchen out once is worth 1.17 on this scale, and getting James Loney out is worth .939. So once we’ve established that, we can sum up a pitcher’s entire season of one batter-faced appearances by taking the sum of each batters out difficulty, and multiplying it by the number of outs the pitcher gets from them. The give the pitcher a bonus for getting a double play off a batter who is tough to get out at all. Then, to create an average I divide that by the sum of the reciprocal of each batter’s out difficulty. I’ll try to explain this better another time.
The point is, looking exclusively at one-batter-faced appearances by lefty relievers, and pitchers who have had at least 10 such appearances this year, Scott Elbert of the Dodgers has been the most effective. He’s had 11 appearances where he faced one batter, and gotten the batter out 9 of those times. And 2 of those 9 were double plays. He’s gotten 5 outs in 4 appearances against batters who are at least 10% better than the league average at not making outs. He got Joey Votto (1.251 out difficulty) once, and 4 outs in 3 appearances against Carlos Gonzalez (1.109). Jon Jay (1.104) is the only “tough out” that Elbert has failed to get this year. All 11 batters he’s faced in loogy appearances have been harder than average to get out, and his total work in those situations give him a PORK of 1.17. Matt Reynolds is next behind him with a 1.09 PORK, and he’s only failed to get his one batter out once in 12 chances. But, he scores lower because he only got one “tough out” (Prince Fielder – 1.123), and the batter he failed to get out should have been on the easy side – Ike Davis, at .960. The group of batters he faced just weren’t as tough as what Elbert went up against.
Javier Lopez has the most 1BF appearances this year among lefties, with 28, and he’s got an impressive .97 PORK in those appearances.

Here are the lefties who have had at least 10 appearances where they faced just once batter, and how they rank in PORK.

Pitcher PORK 1BF Appearances tough outs
Scott Elbert (LAD) 1.17 11 5
Matt Reynolds (COL) 1.09 12 1
Javier Lopez (SF) .97 28 4
Andrew Miller (BOS) .97 12 0
Boone Logan (NYY) .94 10 1
Tim Byrdak (NYM) .91 19 0
Jose Mijares (SF) .85 10 1
Clay Rapada (NYY) .85 22 3
Marc Rzepczynski (STL) .84 15 1
Lucas Luetge (SEA) .77 20 0
Joe Thatcher (SD) .77 11 0
Randy Choate (LAD) .74 27 3
Wesley Wright (HOU) .54 17 0

As you can see, this might not turn out to be Wesley Wright’s specialty for the long term.

The nice thing about this stat, though I realize it’s a bit convoluted, is it works for comparing any pitching category – starters, relievers, 9th inning with a small lead only guys, 8th inning with a small lead only guys, anything really. It’s not that interesting for Starters though, because it just tells you that Verlander and Felix Hernandez and Matt Cain are really good, and we already knew that. I’ll be posting more about this eventually.

League Wide consistency is consistent

Thursday, February 9th, 2012

For the 2010 MLB season, the league wide BACON calculation came to .654388.  For 2011, it came to .654381.  So from 2010 to 2011, league wide BACON went down by 0.001%.  There hasn’t been any other season in the live ball era where the BACON didn’t change by at least 0.1% from the prior season.

While we’re hear, why not take a look at the career BACON leaders among active players (active in this case meaning they played in 2011 and have over 500 career at-bats)

#1 Ichiro Suzuki – .823
#2 Derek Jeter – .800
#3 Jacoby Ellsbury – .796
#4 Albert Pujols – .782
#5 Starlin Castro – .778
#6 Joe Mauer – .778
#7 Vladimir Guerrero – .778
#8 Matt Holliday – .775
#9 Michael Young – .775
#10 Jose Reyes – .772
#11 Magglio Ordonez – .770
#12 Victor Martinez – .769
#13 Placido Polanco – .766
#14 Juan Pierre – .766
#15 Robinson Cano – .765
#16 Miguel Cabrera – .764
#17 Hanley Ramirez – .763
#18 Ryan Braun – .762
#19 Pablo Sandoval – .760
#20 Ryan Zimmerman – .758
#21 Todd Helton – .756
#22 Eric Hosmer – .755
#23 Hunter Pence – .755
#24 Dustin Pedroia – .755
#25 Joey Votto – .755
#26 Martin Prado – .753
#27 Carl Crawford – .752
#28 Rafael Furcal – .750
#29 Manny Ramirez – .749
#30 Johnny Damon – .749
#31 Josh Hamilton – .749
#32 Brian Roberts – .748
#33 Alex Rodriguez – .748
#34 Jose Tabata – .747
#35 Carlos Gonzalez – .746
#36 Daniel Murphy – .746
#37 Nick Markakis – .745
#38 Ivan Rodriguez – .744
#39 Corey Hart – .743
#40 Billy Butler – .743
#41 Miguel Tejada – .741
#42 Matt Kemp – .741
#43 Freddy Sanchez – .740
#44 David Wright – .740
#45 Chase Utley – .739
#46 Carlos Beltran – .739
#47 Chipper Jones – .739
#48 Alfonso Soriano – .737
#49 Michael Brantley – .736
#50 Buster Posey – .735

and the bottom 50:

#344 Ian Stewart – .605
#345 Don Kelly – .597
#346 Scott Sizemore – .597
#347 Dave Ross – .597
#348 Humberto Quintero – .596
#349 Emmanuel Burriss – .596
#350 Matt Tolbert – .595
#351 Chris Iannetta – .595
#352 Wes Helms – .592
#353 Matt Treanor – .591
#354 Andy LaRoche – .590
#355 Luis Rodriguez – .590
#356 Willie Harris – .589
#357 Jose Molina – .587
#358 Sean Rodriguez – .585
#359 Reid Brignac – .583
#360 John McDonald – .583
#361 Chris Snyder – .580
#362 Greg Dobbs – .579
#363 Omar Quintanilla – .579
#364 Jason Repko – .577
#365 Henry Blanco – .575
#366 Alberto Gonzalez – .571
#367 Adam Rosales – .570
#368 Juan Castro – .569
#369 Josh Wilson – .569
#370 Tyler Colvin – .566
#371 Kelly Shoppach – .566
#372 Ramon Castro – .565
#373 Wil Nieves – .564
#374 Koyie Hill – .561
#375 Dewayne Wise – .555
#376 Lou Marson – .551
#377 Paul Janish – .540
#378 Jayson Nix – .537
#379 Eric Patterson – .535
#380 John Bowker – .533
#381 Ryan Langerhans – .533
#382 Rob Johnson – .525
#383 Pete Orr – .522
#384 Michael Saunders – .516
#385 Jeff Mathis – .513
#386 Carlos Zambrano – .510
#387 Brandon Wood – .481
#388 Livan Hernandez – .467
#389 Javier Vazquez – .407
#390 Jason Marquis – .395
#391 Randy Wolf – .372
#392 Roy Oswalt – .326
#393 Ryan Dempster – .221

Postseason BACON (through 2010)

Monday, October 3rd, 2011

It’s not easy to be consistent in the playoffs. Below are the career postseason BACON numbers for everyone who has had 100 at-bats in the playoffs.

Batter BACON 0 hit games Total Games AB Hits
Darin Erstad .907 3 29 118 40
Thurman Munson .899 3 30 129 46
Lou Gehrig .874 5 34 119 43
Lenny Dykstra .866 7 32 112 36
Pat Borders .856 5 31 111 35
Roberto Clemente .850 4 26 107 34
Dave Concepcion .842 6 29 101 30
Steve Garvey .838 10 55 222 75
Edgardo Alfonzo .838 5 28 117 35
Derek Jeter .826 29 147 599 185
Tim Raines .817 8 32 126 34
Joe Carter .815 6 29 119 30
Will Clark .812 6 31 117 39
Cal Ripken .809 6 28 110 37
Goose Goslin .806 7 32 129 37
Tony Gwynn .806 5 27 108 33
Lance Berkman .803 9 34 122 39
Torii Hunter .802 7 34 131 40
Marquis Grissom .798 12 52 218 69
Paul Molitor .795 6 29 117 43
Tony Fernandez .793 11 43 150 49
Red Rolfe .793 6 28 116 33
Bill Russell .789 12 49 194 57
Pete Rose .787 17 67 268 86
Lou Piniella .787 12 44 141 43
Fred McGriff .782 13 50 188 57
Willie Wilson .780 9 37 150 40
George Brett .777 10 43 166 56
Mike Piazza .775 9 32 120 29
Harold Baines .775 9 31 102 33
Roberto Alomar .770 15 58 230 72
Paul O’Neill .769 25 85 299 85
Yadier Molina .769 9 31 108 34
Garry Maddox .766 8 29 107 29
Jeff Conine .765 9 31 102 31
Todd Zeile .761 8 29 113 33
Dan Gladden .760 7 24 104 29
Johnny Damon .758 15 55 244 68
J.D. Drew .755 17 54 184 48
Willie McGee .755 15 51 192 53
Carney Lansford .750 10 33 128 39
Bobby Richardson .748 12 34 131 40
Manny Sanguillen .748 9 29 103 29
Babe Ruth .744 12 40 129 42
Joe DiMaggio .744 15 51 199 54
Kevin Youkilis .739 9 28 111 34
Boog Powell .738 10 33 126 33
Gary Carter .737 8 30 118 33
Don Baylor .736 12 38 121 33
Eddie Collins .734 10 34 128 42
Hank Bauer .734 17 50 188 46
Moises Alou .731 10 34 134 37
Brooks Robinson .731 12 39 145 44
Keith Hernandez .726 9 30 117 31
Duke Snider .722 12 36 133 38
Terry Pendleton .722 25 66 230 58
Greg Gagne .720 9 27 100 22
Alex Rodriguez .719 21 63 231 67
Joe Gordon .718 8 29 103 25
Jermaine Dye .718 14 44 163 44
Chipper Jones .718 29 92 333 96
Hideki Matsui .717 16 56 205 64
Bob Boone .717 12 35 106 33
Robinson Cano .716 11 37 141 35
Devon White .714 14 46 189 56
Nomar Garciaparra .714 11 32 112 36
Albert Pujols .714 17 56 199 64
David Ortiz .713 20 66 244 69
Dustin Pedroia .713 8 28 115 29
Bret Boone .712 9 31 118 34
Mark Lemke .711 19 61 232 63
Frankie Frisch .711 15 50 197 58
Jay Bell .710 11 30 107 28
Pee Wee Reese .710 14 44 169 46
A.J. Pierzynski .710 10 30 100 30
Jimmy Rollins .708 13 41 168 38
Javy Lopez .707 20 59 205 57
Mickey Mantle .704 21 64 230 59
Jim Edmonds .704 21 64 230 63
Larry Bowa .703 11 32 118 30
Edgar Martinez .703 11 34 128 34
Rickey Henderson .703 19 59 222 63
Wade Boggs .701 13 39 154 42
Benito Santiago .700 9 28 100 25
Brian Jordan .700 13 38 140 35
Phil Rizzuto .699 17 52 183 45
David Eckstein .699 15 44 176 49
Manny Ramirez .695 35 111 410 117
Jeff Kent .694 20 48 170 47
Rafael Furcal .694 13 41 170 41
Tony Kubek .692 14 37 146 35
Reggie Smith .692 11 32 107 25
Kenny Lofton .691 31 95 392 97
Darryl Strawberry .690 17 40 126 32
Ryan Howard .689 14 41 151 42
Johnny Bench .686 14 45 169 45
Jayson Werth .686 15 43 153 41
Derrek Lee .685 9 27 111 27
Gil McDougald .684 18 52 190 45
Bill Skowron .684 16 39 133 39
Luis Sojo .683 14 35 101 26
Lonnie Smith .683 24 61 205 57
Dwight Evans .681 12 32 113 27
John Olerud .679 23 66 237 66
Vladimir Guerrero .678 15 44 171 45
Orlando Cabrera .678 12 37 149 34
Bernie Williams .677 43 121 465 128
Bill Dickey .676 13 38 145 37
Trot Nixon .674 15 42 138 39
Garret Anderson .673 13 36 147 36
Shane Victorino .673 14 41 156 41
Carl Furillo .672 16 40 128 34
Richie Hebner .670 13 30 100 27
Dave Henderson .669 14 35 121 36
Bill Mueller .669 14 36 145 34
Barry Bonds .669 18 48 151 37
Elston Howard .667 22 54 171 42
Bob Meusel .667 12 34 129 29
Chris Chambliss .667 11 30 114 32
Craig Biggio .665 14 40 167 39
Mike Schmidt .664 13 36 140 33
Matt Williams .663 18 51 190 47
Omar Vizquel .662 21 57 228 57
Steve Finley .661 20 50 165 41
Ivan Rodriguez .660 14 40 153 39
Ron Cey .658 16 45 161 42
Dave Parker .658 12 30 111 26
Yogi Berra .656 29 75 259 71
Carlos Ruiz .656 15 41 125 35
George Kelly .653 10 26 101 25
Bengie Molina .652 16 40 132 36
Reggie Jackson .651 28 77 281 78
Casey Blake .650 9 27 103 24
Darrell Porter .650 15 37 120 32
David Bell .650 14 35 117 33
Tony Womack .647 15 38 156 33
Willie Stargell .647 14 36 133 37
Steve Yeager .645 15 38 107 27
Tony Lazzeri .645 13 32 107 28
Dusty Baker .644 15 40 149 42
Juan Uribe .644 12 30 101 21
Chuck Knoblauch .643 25 65 244 63
Jackie Robinson .642 15 38 137 32
Jeff Bagwell .642 15 33 106 24
Jorge Posada .639 47 118 402 97
Mariano Duncan .638 19 43 152 37
Jason Varitek .636 25 63 228 54
Sal Bando .635 17 44 159 39
Mike Lowell .635 13 33 115 29
Brad Ausmus .632 14 33 106 26
Jim Thome .631 30 66 217 47
Tino Martinez .629 39 97 356 83
Joe Rudi .629 15 38 140 36
Juan Rivera .629 17 35 105 25
David Justice .628 44 112 398 89
Scott Brosius .628 23 58 196 48
Mickey Cochrane .627 12 31 110 27
Andruw Jones .626 31 70 238 65
Davey Lopes .624 22 49 181 43
Jason Giambi .623 20 45 138 40
Roy Campanella .623 13 32 114 27
Hal McRae .622 22 48 143 42
Chase Utley .622 17 41 148 36
Placido Polanco .618 14 32 110 30
Paul Blair .616 21 46 146 38
Tony Perez .616 19 47 172 41
Scott Rolen .616 14 34 125 27
Tom Herr .614 14 37 140 31
Edgar Renteria .612 27 66 242 61
Frank Robinson .611 15 35 126 30
Mickey Rivers .608 12 29 120 37
Dave Winfield .604 11 26 101 21
Vince Coleman .604 12 28 111 22
Gary Sheffield .602 20 44 161 40
Larry Walker .600 12 28 100 23
Davey Johnson .595 14 31 111 25
Mark Teixeira .592 12 26 103 22
Alfonso Soriano .592 18 44 174 37
Bert Campaneris .590 15 36 144 35
Chili Davis .590 15 34 100 21
Willie Randolph .586 22 46 162 36
Eric Chavez .583 11 27 108 24
Roger Maris .579 19 41 152 33
Sandy Alomar .578 22 47 173 37
Eddie Murray .572 19 44 159 41
Graig Nettles .571 24 53 182 41
Jim Gilliam .571 18 39 147 31
Bobby Bonilla .570 23 46 149 32
Craig Counsell .570 16 35 114 27
Andy Van Slyke .570 13 28 100 19
Jose Vizcaino .567 17 34 104 23
Mark McGwire .566 23 42 129 28
Jeff Blauser .565 29 56 168 35
Ryan Klesko .564 33 62 165 39
Ozzie Smith .563 20 42 144 34
Ron Gant .561 23 51 189 43
Chone Figgins .557 14 30 122 21
Frankie Crosetti .557 14 29 115 20
Gil Hodges .550 19 39 131 35
Joe Morgan .547 24 50 181 33
Robin Ventura .540 20 37 124 22
Frank White .540 19 41 150 32
Raul Ibanez .539 17 32 102 24
Walt Weiss .531 25 46 147 28
Pedro Feliz .519 20 37 108 22
Mark Belanger .500 21 39 126 23
Reggie Sanders .493 34 64 221 43
Nick Swisher .467 18 32 105 17
Cesar Geronimo .467 19 34 120 20
Jose Canseco .456 18 30 103 19
Joe Girardi .447 23 39 114 21
Candy Maldonado .447 22 34 103 17
Gene Tenace .412 26 41 114 18

BACON race update

Friday, September 2nd, 2011

It’s September, which means we’re in the home stretch for various important races, like the one to see who will be the 2011 BACON champion.

It’s really anybody’s race in both leagues with just .006 of a BACON separating Robinson Cano from Jacoby Ellsbury.  These things can change a lot within the course of a month – last year Ichiro trailed Adrian Beltre by .025 in the BACON race, but finished the season with the BACON title, while Beltre fell to 4th.

Batter BACON AB HBP 0 hit games
Robinson Cano .831 528 10 26
Jacoby Ellsbury .825 543 8 27
Ryan Braun .818 468 4 25
Miguel Cabrera .813 486 3 29
Shane Victorino .810 411 6 23
Jose Reyes .804 445 0 22
Hunter Pence .800 506 1 28
Michael Young .798 540 2 31
Joey Votto .796 496 4 36
Michael Bourn .795 541 3 30

As usual, you can keep up to date with the season BACON statistics every day on the BACON page here, but keep in mind that those standings include more than just the “qualified” players. To qualify for things like the batting title, and the BACON title, a player needs at least 3.1 plate appearance per game his team has played.

Career BACONxHBP and BACONxH leaders

Friday, December 10th, 2010

When you want to know how consistent a batter was at getting hits on a game to game basis, you can you BACON. When you want to know if a batter was a consistent hitter, and also got hit a lot, you can multiply BACON by career HBPs. And when you want to know if someone got a lot of hits and also spread them out nicely over the games they played, you can multiply BACON by hits. You can do all those things, but it would be easier to just keep reading below and let me do the math for you.

Below are the top 25 in BACONxHBP and BACONxH from 1919 to 2010.

BACONxHBP

Batter HBP BACON BACONxHBP
Craig Biggio 285 .734 209.1
Jason Kendall 248 .733 181.9
Don Baylor 267 .678 181.1
Ron Hunt 243 .695 169.0
Frank Robinson 198 .719 142.4
Minnie Minoso 192 .741 142.3
Andres Galarraga 178 .727 129.5
Carlos Delgado 172 .699 120.2
Fernando Vina 157 .748 117.5
Derek Jeter 143 .801 114.5
Alex Rodriguez 149 .750 111.7
Jason Giambi 164 .673 110.4
Brady Anderson 154 .686 105.7
Nellie Fox 142 .739 104.9
Chet Lemon 151 .694 104.7
Chuck Knoblauch 139 .751 104.3
Larry Walker 138 .740 102.2
Carlton Fisk 143 .694 99.2
Gary Sheffield 135 .724 97.7
David Eckstein 134 .726 97.3
Jeff Bagwell 128 .742 94.9
Jeff Kent 125 .733 91.6
Jose Guillen 131 .690 90.4
Brian Downing 129 .669 86.4
Damion Easley 132 .649 85.6

BACONxH

Just for fun, here are the bottom 25 in career BACONxH, from 1919 to 2010, with a minimum of 5000 at-bats.

Batter Hits BACON BACONxH
Pete Rose 4257 .759 3231.9
Hank Aaron 3824 .765 2927.0
Stan Musial 3655 .769 2812.4
Paul Molitor 3319 .770 2557.2
Tony Gwynn 3141 .798 2506.2
Paul Waner 3152 .793 2499.9
Willie Mays 3288 .740 2432.4
Carl Yastrzemski 3419 .708 2419.7
Rod Carew 3053 .782 2388.3
Roberto Clemente 3041 .775 2355.8
Al Simmons 2928 .801 2346.7
Derek Jeter 2926 .801 2343.8
George Brett 3154 .740 2333.9
Wade Boggs 3010 .774 2330.0
Eddie Murray 3255 .713 2320.9
Robin Yount 3142 .734 2306.0
Lou Brock 3025 .762 2304.7
Cal Ripken 3184 .719 2287.9
Frankie Frisch 2879 .786 2262.9
Craig Biggio 3060 .734 2244.9
Dave Winfield 3110 .717 2230.4
Al Kaline 3007 .739 2223.1
Rafael Palmeiro 3020 .734 2215.4
Charlie Gehringer 2839 .777 2205.2
Sam Rice 2738 .801 2193.8
Batter HBP BACON BACONxHBP
Rollie Hemsley 4 .656 2.6
Otis Nixon 5 .701 3.5
Sam West 5 .737 3.7
Granny Hamner 6 .709 4.3
Vern Stephens 6 .726 4.4
Red Kress 6 .738 4.4
Pete Suder 7 .663 4.6
Pete O’Brien 7 .669 4.7
Ozzie Guillen 7 .670 4.7
Ruben Sierra 7 .700 4.9
Jose Cruz 7 .700 4.9
Neifi Perez 7 .702 4.9
Bobby Richardson 7 .715 5.0
Lance Johnson 7 .743 5.2
Mickey Stanley 8 .671 5.4
Bill Virdon 8 .717 5.7
George McQuinn 8 .717 5.7
Del Unser 9 .667 6.0
Garret Anderson 8 .754 6.0
Rick Manning 9 .676 6.1
Garry Templeton 9 .707 6.4
Hughie Critz 9 .715 6.4
Rick Ferrell 10 .681 6.8
Bill Doran 10 .690 6.9
Bill Terry 9 .790 7.1

If I dropped that down to 3000 minimum at-bats, you get Mark Lemke at 0.0 BACONxH, because he never got hit by a pitch. Also, John Kruk at 1.4.

Here are the bottom 25 for BACONxH:
(1919-2010, 5000ab minimum)

Batter Hits BACON BACONxH
Mark Belanger 1316 .577 759.5
Eddie Miller 1270 .631 801.9
Zoilo Versalles 1246 .651 810.7
Ed Brinkman 1355 .599 811.3
Ken McMullen 1273 .639 813.0
Jay Buhner 1273 .647 824.0
Denis Menke 1282 .646 828.1
Leo Durocher 1320 .630 832.1
Bob Allison 1281 .650 833.2
Mickey Stanley 1243 .671 833.6
Pete Suder 1269 .663 841.5
Freddie Patek 1344 .629 845.2
Del Crandall 1297 .653 847.5
Doug Rader 1303 .651 848.6
Darrell Porter 1369 .624 854.4
Jose Valentin 1348 .643 866.4
Rollie Hemsley 1321 .656 867.1
Andre Thornton 1342 .648 869.0
Eddie Joost 1341 .649 870.4
Pat Burrell 1351 .648 875.6
Matt Stairs 1356 .648 878.9
Cecil Fielder 1313 .670 879.4
Tony Armas 1302 .676 880.7
Joe Pepitone 1315 .677 890.6
Dave Henderson 1324 .673 891.4

Live ball era career BACON leaders

Sunday, December 5th, 2010

Retrosheet has gamelogs back to 1919, so there’s really not any good excuse for the internet not to know who has the best career BACON in that period of time. Or, if I’m going to make up a stat, I might as well figure out how the current generation stands up to the historical players, to the extent that that’s possible. Right?
Anyway, here are the top 100 career BACONs for players with 2500 career ABs from 1919 to 2010.

Bold = current players
Italics = players who started before 1919, and are therefor incomplete for the career BACON calculation. The number of missing seasons is indicated in parenthesis.

Rank Batter BACON Hits BACONxH
1 Ichiro Suzuki 2001-2010 .832 2246 1868.2
2 Rogers Hornsby 1919-1937 (4) .811 2473 2006.7
3 Ty Cobb 1919-1928 (14) .809 1667 1348.4
4 Harry Heilmann 1919-1932 (4) .806 2258 1819.8
5 Joe DiMaggio 1936-1951 .806 2219 1787.6
6 George Sisler 1919-1930 (4) .805 2211 1780.8
7 Lloyd Waner 1927-1945 .803 2459 1974.9
8 Al Simmons 1924-1944 .801 2928 2346.7
9 Sam Rice 1919-1934 (4) .801 2738 2193.8
10 Derek Jeter 1995-2010 .801 2926 2343.8
11 Tris Speaker 1919-1928 (12) .800 1642 1312.8
12 Tony Gwynn 1982-2001 .798 3141 2506.2
13 Earle Combs 1924-1935 .798 1866 1488.5
14 Eddie Collins 1919-1930 (13) .797 1497 1192.8
15 Bobby Veach 1919-1925 (7) .795 1087 864.4
16 Zack Wheat 1919-1927 (10) .794 1496 1187.3
17 Paul Waner 1926-1944 .793 3152 2499.9
18 Lance Richbourg 1921-1932 .792 806 638
19 Joe Medwick 1932-1948 .791 2471 1954.8
20 Bill Terry 1923-1936 .790 2193 1733.4
21 Heinie Manush 1923-1939 .790 2526 1995.8
22 Lefty O’Doul 1919-1934 .788 1140 898.3
23 Riggs Stephenson 1921-1934 .788 1515 1193.5
24 Edd Roush 1919-1931 (6) .787 1743 1372.1
25 Jack Tobin 1919-1927 (4) .786 1414 1111.4
26 Frankie Frisch 1919-1937 .786 2879 2262.9
27 Lou Gehrig 1923-1939 .785 2721 2136.3
28 Albert Pujols 2001-2010 .785 1900 1491
29 Charlie Jamieson 1919-1932 (4) .784 1750 1372.5
30 Joe Mauer 2004-2010 .784 1011 792.6
31 Rod Carew 1967-1985 .782 3053 2388.3
32 Pie Traynor 1920-1937 .781 2416 1887.7
33 Babe Ruth 1919-1935 (5) .781 2670 2085.1
34 Dick Porter 1929-1934 .781 775 605.1
35 Jo-Jo Moore 1930-1941 .780 1615 1259.9
36 Nomar Garciaparra 1996-2009 .780 1747 1362
37 Matt Holliday 2004-2010 .779 1216 947.6
38 Johnny Hodapp 1925-1933 .779 880 685.7
39 Irish Meusel 1919-1927 (2) .779 1389 1081.6
40 Johnny Frederick 1929-1934 .778 954 741.8
41 Don Mattingly 1982-1995 .778 2153 1674
42 Vladimir Guerrero 1996-2010 .777 2427 1886.2
43 Charlie Gehringer 1924-1942 .777 2839 2205.2
44 Goose Goslin 1921-1938 .776 2735 2122.2
45 Kiki Cuyler 1921-1938 .776 2299 1783.4
46 Hanley Ramirez 2006-2010 .776 934 724.3
47 Cecil Travis 1933-1947 .775 1544 1196.8
48 Roberto Clemente 1955-1972 .775 3041 2355.8
49 Wade Boggs 1982-1999 .774 3010 2330
50 Pete Fox 1933-1945 .774 1679 1298.7
51 Baby Doll Jacobson 1919-1927 (2) .773 1545 1194.8
52 Magglio Ordonez 1997-2010 .772 2072 1600.5
53 Jack Fournier 1920-1927 (7) .772 1213 936.6
54 Kirby Puckett 1984-1995 .772 2304 1778.9
55 Ralph Garr 1968-1980 .772 1567 1209.5
56 Joe Vosmik 1930-1944 .772 1682 1298.1
57 Michael Young 2001-2010 .771 1848 1425.3
58 Bob Dillinger 1946-1951 .771 951 733.4
59 Paul Molitor 1978-1998 .770 3319 2557.2
60 Rip Radcliff 1934-1943 .770 1267 975.9
61 Ed Morgan 1928-1934 .770 879 676.9
62 Stan Musial 1941-1963 .769 3655 2812.4
63 Ted Williams 1939-1960 .769 2654 2041.5
64 Dom DiMaggio 1940-1953 .769 1682 1293.5
65 Billy Herman 1931-1947 .769 2345 1803
66 Victor Martinez 2002-2010 .768 1122 862.1
67 Matty Alou 1960-1974 .767 1783 1367.5
68 Placido Polanco 1998-2010 .767 1836 1407.7
69 Jimmie Foxx 1925-1945 .766 2645 2026.7
70 George Burns 1919-1929 (5) .766 1375 1053.4
71 Richie Ashburn 1948-1962 .766 2581 1976.6
72 Shannon Stewart 1995-2008 .766 1653 1265.4
73 Chuck Klein 1928-1944 .765 2076 1589.2
74 Johnny Pesky 1942-1954 .765 1467 1122.9
75 Hank Aaron 1954-1976 .765 3824 2927
76 Roberto Alomar 1988-2004 .765 2724 2084.2
77 Juan Pierre 2000-2010 .765 1842 1409.2
78 Jose Reyes 2003-2010 .765 1119 855.8
79 Mickey Rivers 1970-1984 .764 1660 1268.4
80 Bob Meusel 1920-1930 .764 1693 1293.3
81 Freddie Lindstrom 1924-1936 .763 1747 1333.2
82 Jimmy Johnston 1919-1926 (5) .763 1138 868.2
83 Lou Brock 1961-1979 .762 3025 2304.7
84 Ken Williams 1919-1929 (3) .762 1499 1141.9
85 Hank Greenberg 1930-1947 .762 1628 1240
86 Carson Bigbee 1919-1926 (3) .762 973 741
87 Mule Haas 1925-1938 .761 1257 956.8
88 Ross Youngs 1919-1926 (2) .761 1339 1018.8
89 Babe Herman 1926-1945 .761 1819 1383.4
90 Harvey Kuenn 1952-1966 .760 2092 1590.9
91 John Stone 1928-1938 .760 1391 1057.6
92 Kenny Lofton 1991-2007 .760 2428 1845.8
93 Carl Crawford 2002-2010 .760 1480 1124.5
94 Earl Averill 1929-1941 .760 2019 1534
95 Tommy Holmes 1942-1952 .759 1508 1145.2
96 Dale Mitchell 1946-1956 .759 1245 945.4
97 Ron LeFlore 1974-1982 .759 1283 974.2
98 Pete Rose 1963-1986 .759 4257 3231.9
99 Buddy Myer 1925-1941 .759 2131 1617.8
100 Joe Sewell 1920-1933 .759 2226 1689.7

Active career BACON leaders

Friday, October 22nd, 2010

Here’s a look at the top 50 active players in career BACON.
(minimum 500 career at-bats)
1) Ichiro Suzuki – .832
2) Derek Jeter – .801
3) Albert Pujols – .785
4) Joe Mauer – .784
5) Austin Jackson – .782
6) Matt Holliday – .779
7) Vladimir Guerrero – .777
8) Hanley Ramirez – .776
9) Magglio Ordonez – .772
10) Michael Young – .771
11) Jacoby Ellsbury – .770
12) Victor Martinez – .768
13) Placido Polanco – .767
14) Juan Pierre – .765
15) Jose Reyes – .765
16) Carl Crawford – .760
17) Chris Coghlan – .758
18) Miguel Cabrera – .757
19) Ryan Zimmerman – .756
20) Rafael Furcal – .756
21) Todd Helton – .755
22) Martin Prado – .755
23) Robinson Cano – .755
24) Garret Anderson – .754
25) Nick Markakis – .751
26) Dustin Pedroia – .751
27) Brian Roberts – .751
28) Manny Ramirez – .750
29) Alex Rodriguez – .750
30) Johnny Damon – .750
31) Ryan Braun – .749
32) David DeJesus – .748
33) Carlos Gonzalez – .748
34) Josh Hamilton – .748
35) Mike Aviles – .748
36) David Wright – .747
37) Ivan Rodriguez – .747
38) Joey Votto – .747
39) Miguel Tejada – .745
40) Hunter Pence – .745
41) Alfonso Soriano – .743
42) Mike Sweeney – .743
43) Billy Butler – .742
44) Pablo Sandoval – .742
45) Chase Utley – .742
46) Mark Grudzielanek – .740
47) Chipper Jones – .739
48) Ryan Sweeney – .739
49) Freddy Sanchez – .739
50) Carlos Beltran – .738

and just for fun, here are the bottom 50, with a minimum of 2000 plate appearances (to weed out the pitchers):
1) Juan Castro – .569
2) Henry Blanco – .575
3) Jason LaRue – .590
4) Willie Harris – .592
5) Wes Helms – .601
6) John Buck – .607
7) Russell Branyan – .611
8) Alex Cora – .617
9) Gregg Zaun – .619
10) Rod Barajas – .620
11) Jonny Gomes – .621
12) Geoff Blum – .626
13) Miguel Olivo – .628
14) Jose Bautista – .628
15) Eric Hinske – .630
16) Brandon Inge – .632
17) Adam Everett – .637
18) Carlos Pena – .639
19) Casey Kotchman – .640
20) Bill Hall – .641
21) Bobby Crosby – .641
22) Jamey Carroll – .642
23) Jason Michaels – .642
24) Nick Punto – .643
25) Brian Schneider – .643
26) Brad Ausmus – .644
27) Adam Dunn – .645
28) Pedro Feliz – .648
29) Pat Burrell – .648
30) Matt Stairs – .648
31) Juan Uribe – .649
32) Troy Glaus – .649
33) Jason Varitek – .650
34) Gary MatthewsJr. – .652
35) Craig Counsell – .652
36) Mike Lamb – .653
37) Josh Willingham – .655
38) Clint Barmes – .657
39) Yorvit Torrealba – .657
40) Miguel Cairo – .658
41) Austin Kearns – .658
42) Luke Scott – .658
43) Gabe Kapler – .659
44) Mike Cameron – .664
45) Dan Uggla – .666
46) Ramon Hernandez – .668
47) Nate McLouth – .668
48) Chris Young – .669
49) Alex Gonzalez – .669
50) Jerry Hairston Jr. – .670

All-Bacon All-stars for 2010

Wednesday, July 7th, 2010

I don’t necessarily advocate basing a players All-Star worthiness on the first half of a single season, and if I did, I’d pick the All-Star team based on who got hit by the most pitches in the first half of the year. But, if you really wanted to make sure you’re all-star batters weren’t going to show up on one of their days when they can’t hit, you might want to base their selection on a stat that measures batting consistency.  Like BACON.  If you were inclined to pick this year’s all-star team based on their 2010 BACON (through July 6th), here’s what the teams would look like. (You’d have to find some other way to select pitchers, since I haven’t worked out how to do Bacon-against).

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Starters:
Catcher – Ronny Paulino (FLA) – 0.775 BACON, 50.4 BACONxH
First Base – Gaby Sanchez (FLA) – 0.782 BACON, 71.2 BACONxH
2nd Base – Brandon Phillips (CIN) – 0.808 BACON, 84.8 BACONxH
3rd Base – Placido Polanco (PHI) – 0.785 BACON, 65.2 BACONxH
Short Stop – Rafael Furcal (LAD) – 0.789 BACON, 59.2 BACONxH
Outfield – Carlos Gonzalez (COL) – 0.803 BACON, 73.8 BACONxH
Outfield – Corey Hart (MIL) – 0.793 BACON, 64.2 BACONxH
Outfield – Andre Ethier (LAD) – 0.780 BACON, 64.0 BACONxH
DH – Matt Kemp (LAD) – 0.773 BACON, 68.0 BACONxH
(Kemp would be the 4th outfield in BACON, but since they’re in an AL park, he gets the DH slot)

Bench:
Outfield – Angel Pagan (NYM) – 0.768 BACON, 64.5 BACONxH
Outfield – Chris Coghlan (FLA) – 0.756 BACON, 65.0 BACONxH
Outfield – Cody Ross (FLA) – 0.747 BACON, 68.0 BACONxH
Catcher – Russell Martin (LAD) – 0.735 BACON, 48.5 BACONxH
First Base – Ryan Howard (PHI) – 0.772 BACON, 74.1 BACONxH
2nd Base – Martin Prado (ATL) – 0.789 BACON, 93.1 BACONxH
3rd Base – Casey McGehee (MIL) – 0.765 BACON, 64.2 BACONxH
Short Stop – Troy Tulowitzki (COL) – 0.770 BACON, 55.5 BACONxH
2nd Base (Utility) – David Eckstein (SD) – 0.758 BACON, 62.9 BACONxH
Eckstein gets a utility slot for having the best BACON among players who were crowded out at their position in the NL.

American League

Starters:
Catcher – Joe Mauer (MIN) – 0.777 BACON, 63.7 BACONxH
First Base – Justin Morneau (MIN) – 0.811 BACON, 81.1 BACONxH
2nd Base – Robinson Cano (NYY) – 0.797 BACON, 86.9 BACONxH
3rd Base – Evan Longoria (TB) – 0.801 BACON, 76.1 BACONxH
Short Stop – Marco Scutaro (BOS) – 0.786 BACON, 75.4 BACONxH
Outfield – Josh Hamilton (TEX) – 0.826 BACON, 90.9 BACONxH
Outfield – Ichiro Suzuki (SEA) – 0.804 BACON, 89.2 BACONxH
Outfield – Brennan Boesch (DET) – 0.803 BACON, 62.7 BACONxH
DH – Vladimir Guerrero (TEX) – 0.840 BACON, 84.8 BACONxH

Bench:
Outfield – Austin Jackson (DET) – 0.800 BACON, 73.6 BACONxH
Outfield – Scott Podsednik (KC) – 0.799 BACON, 76.7 BACONxH
Outfield – David DeJesus (KC) – 0.789 BACON, 81.3 BACONxH
Catcher – Jason Kendall (KC) – 0.750 BACON, 57.8 BACONxH
First Base – Miguel Cabrera (DET) – 0.807 BACON, 83.1 BACONxH
2nd Base – Mike Aviles (KC) – 0.791 BACON, 50.6 BACONxH
3rd Base – Adrian Beltre (BOS) – 0.794 BACON, 82.5 BACONxH
Short Stop – Elvis Andrus (TEX) – 0.777 BACON, 70.0 BACONxH
3rd Base (Utility) – Michael Young (TEX) – 0.790 BACON, 83.0 BACONxH

As you can see, if the all-star team was picked this way, you’d have a surprisingly high number of Royals on it. Not that there’s anything wrong with that.

Also, I still think that once the players get picked to play in the All-Star game, they should be allowed to choose up sides school-yard style, as I mentioned last year.

S.P.A.M. by team

Tuesday, June 29th, 2010

Last week I unveiled a new method of measuring how slump-prone major league players are, calling it the Slump Proneness Analysis Metric, or SPAM.  It’s part of a growing collection of new sabr-meat-ric stats I’m working on, to fill in the many holes left by the current trends in baseball statistics, along with Bacon, which measures batting consistency from game to game.  I mentioned in the introduction to S.P.A.M. that it could be easily used on a team level instead of just a player level, so here it is.  Put simply, S.P.A.M. is the average length of hitless streaks per plate appearance.  So in this case, we look at team hitless streaks, taking each plate appearance and assigning it 0 if it’s a hit, 1 if it’s the first non-hit plate appearance after a hit, and 10 if it’s the 10th consecutive hitless plate appearance for the team.  Add all those up and divide by the number of plate appearances, and you get the average hitless streak of the team, or as I call it, their S.P.A.M. (Intentional walks are excluded from this calculation, but everything else is left in).

Here are the 2010 S.P.A.M. rankings by team, including their SPAMs just for the month of June.

Team 2010 S.P.A.M. 15+ PA hitless streaks Longest hitles streak June S.P.A.M.
Royals 3.02 10 25 2.78
Yankees 3.03 12 21 3.21
Reds 3.04 11 23 2.99
Twins 3.05 10 25 3.20
Dodgers 3.09 8 29 2.97
Red Sox 3.11 14 24 2.75
Rangers 3.14 12 25 2.66
Cardinals 3.15 13 20 3.18
Tigers 3.15 11 31 3.23
Orioles 3.18 10 25 2.99
A’s 3.25 16 30 2.55
Rockies 3.32 11 23 3.29
Giants 3.32 16 21 3.07
Astros 3.33 12 23 3.34
Brewers 3.33 15 31 3.69
Mets 3.34 15 22 3.13
Pirates 3.36 8 23 3.06
Marlins 3.36 11 33 3.26
Cubs 3.38 17 27 3.31
Nationals 3.43 13 34 3.86
Indians 3.49 13 31 3.47
Phillies 3.49 17 32 3.74
Angels 3.56 17 29 3.22
Braves 3.57 15 37 3.04
Diamondbacks 3.59 16 29 3.33
Mariners 3.61 10 35 3.34
Padres 3.62 18 26 3.91
White Sox 3.66 14 32 3.55
Blue Jays 3.81 17 26 3.95
Rays 4.18 20 48 4.51

Not surprisingly, the Rays come out looking really bad based on this stat – having had 2 different no-hitters thrown against them this year (or rather one perfect game and a no hitter). That leads to some very long hitless streaks. But, they’ve had 20 different streaks of 15 or more consecutive plate appearances without a hit, so it’s not just that they’ve run up against some pitchers on the wrong night – the appear to be slump-prone in general. A 15 PA hitless streak is approximately a 5 inning draught of hitlessness, give or take some walking and HBPs.  They’ve had 3 different stretches of over 30 plate appearances of hitlessness.
Also not much of a surprise is that the Royals lead the league with the best S.P.A.M. They also have the highest batting average in the league (tied with the Rangers). But, the Rangers have been slightly less good at evenly distributing their hits. Oakland has had the best S.P.A.M. in June, at 2.55.  Those just go to show that avoiding hitless streaks doesn’t translate directly to winning, because you also have to cause some hitless streaks, which just means we’ll have to look at S.P.A.M. from the pitching side next.