Archive for May, 2011

2011 SPAM

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

It seems like it’s about time to update everyone on how the league’s batters are doing in SPAM – my sabermeatric stat used to measure which batters are prone to slump (Slump Proneness Analytic Metric). Basically the way this is calculated is that we take every plate appearance for each batter, excluding intentional walks, and calculate how many consecutive plate appearances they’ve had at that point without a hit. Then we take the average of all of them. So if you imagine that your favorite play by play announcer said every time your favorite batter came to bat “he’s gone hitless in his last {some number} plate appearances”, and you took all of those throughout the year and averaged them, that’s how we get SPAM. I high number is bad… like Raul Ibanez, who managed to go 40 consecutive plate appearances without a hit earlier this year has a SPAM of 5.90 – so on average, Ibanez has been on a 5.90 plate appearance hit-less slump. Wilson Betemit, on the other hand, hasn’t gone longer than 7 plate appearances without a hit all year. His SPAM is 1.93.

Here are this years SPAM scores through May 30, 2011:

Batter SPAM Plate
Appearances
15PA
Slumps
Longest
Slump
Adam LaRoche – WSH 6.67 177 2 32
Raul Ibanez – PHI 5.90 207 1 40
Chris Iannetta – COL 5.37 165 3 26
Mark Reynolds – BAL 5.33 203 2 26
Chone Figgins – SEA 5.31 208 2 27
Carlos Santana – CLE 5.24 195 2 26
Brian Roberts – BAL 5.16 178 1 32
Adam Dunn – CWS 5.10 203 4 16
Miguel Olivo – SEA 5.01 175 1 28
Nick Swisher – NYY 4.71 200 2 24
Danny Espinosa – WSH 4.56 207 4 17
Ian Kinsler – TEX 4.52 233 2 23
Hanley Ramirez – FLA 4.49 206 3 20
Carlos Pena – CHC 4.44 184 1 22
John Buck – FLA 4.38 180 3 16
Alex Rios – CWS 4.30 220 1 26
Ryan Howard – PHI 4.29 227 2 26
Mark Ellis – OAK 4.24 200 1 18
Sam Fuld – TB 4.23 201 1 23
Ryan Ludwick – SD 4.18 215 2 24
Ian Desmond – WSH 4.12 201 2 19
Ben Francisco – PHI 4.10 180 1 23
Carlos Gonzalez – COL 4.09 216 1 29
Daric Barton – OAK 4.07 222 2 19
Peter Bourjos – LAA 4.02 212 1 25
Aubrey Huff – SF 4.01 213 1 21
Dan Uggla – ATL 4.00 227 1 17
Juan Rivera – TOR 3.99 197 2 19
Austin Jackson – DET 3.93 229 1 21
Torii Hunter – LAA 3.93 240 2 19
Ryan Raburn – DET 3.90 166 2 16
David Wright – NYM 3.88 171 1 23
Colby Rasmus – STL 3.86 224 1 26
Gordon Beckham – CWS 3.83 190 1 16
Nate McLouth – ATL 3.78 194 1 23
Kevin Youkilis – BOS 3.76 211 1 24
Chris Getz – KC 3.71 173 0 13
Brendan Ryan – SEA 3.71 169 1 24
Dustin Pedroia – BOS 3.70 241 2 19
Andrew McCutchen – PIT 3.69 226 2 17
Carl Crawford – BOS 3.66 219 1 16
Chris Young – ARI 3.66 238 1 22
Shin-Soo Choo – CLE 3.62 214 2 21
Danny Valencia – MIN 3.60 207 1 21
Russell Martin – NYY 3.59 171 1 19
Brett Gardner – NYY 3.58 173 2 16
B.J. Upton – TB 3.56 204 2 17
Alcides Escobar – KC 3.53 203 1 16
Frederick Freeman – ATL 3.50 206 3 17
Miguel Tejada – SF 3.50 193 1 16
Michael Stanton – FLA 3.48 194 2 17
Kelly Johnson – ARI 3.48 220 1 20
Jose Tabata – PIT 3.46 197 0 14
David Murphy – TEX 3.45 182 1 18
Mark Trumbo – LAA 3.44 189 1 21
Ben Zobrist – TB 3.44 220 1 19
Brandon Inge – DET 3.41 174 1 15
Bobby Abreu – LAA 3.38 240 1 18
Chris Coghlan – FLA 3.37 225 1 18
Mark Teixeira – NYY 3.37 230 1 21
Brennan Boesch – DET 3.35 191 2 16
Omar Infante – FLA 3.33 216 1 15
Derrek Lee – BAL 3.33 175 0 12
Chris Johnson – HOU 3.31 183 0 14
Chase Headley – SD 3.31 196 1 19
Jack Cust – SEA 3.30 185 1 16
Troy Tulowitzki – COL 3.29 218 1 16
David DeJesus – OAK 3.29 200 1 15
Carlos Quentin – CWS 3.29 219 0 14
Nick Markakis – BAL 3.27 230 0 14
Lance Berkman – STL 3.26 183 1 19
Prince Fielder – MIL 3.24 225 1 19
Jayson Werth – WSH 3.23 221 0 13
Lyle Overbay – PIT 3.23 197 1 16
Justin Smoak – SEA 3.20 194 1 15
Yunel Escobar – TOR 3.20 231 1 18
Carlos Gomez – MIL 3.19 191 0 14
Dexter Fowler – COL 3.18 235 1 15
Matt Wieters – BAL 3.17 175 2 17
Jason Bartlett – SD 3.16 205 1 17
Neil Walker – PIT 3.12 218 2 19
Justin Upton – ARI 3.10 229 1 17
Adrian Beltre – TEX 3.10 225 0 14
Justin Morneau – MIN 3.08 196 0 12
Maicer Izturis – LAA 3.07 200 2 17
Albert Pujols – STL 3.06 239 1 15
Chipper Jones – ATL 3.05 206 0 14
Andre Ethier – LAD 3.04 214 1 25
Derek Jeter – NYY 3.04 237 1 17
Ronny Cedeno – PIT 3.04 169 0 13
Hideki Matsui – OAK 3.03 175 0 10
Matt LaPorta – CLE 3.02 168 0 11
Adam Jones – BAL 3.01 209 1 15
Jack Hannahan – CLE 2.99 169 0 11
Orlando Cabrera – CLE 2.98 193 1 16
Yuniesky Betancourt – MIL 2.97 189 0 12
Carlos Lee – HOU 2.97 209 1 17
Cameron Maybin – SD 2.96 198 0 11
Curtis Granderson – NYY 2.92 225 0 12
Elvis Andrus – TEX 2.88 224 1 16
Paul Konerko – CWS 2.88 236 0 13
A.J. Pierzynski – CWS 2.88 187 0 13
Corey Patterson – TOR 2.87 192 1 19
Buster Posey – SF 2.86 182 1 16
James Loney – LAD 2.86 203 0 13
Stephen Drew – ARI 2.86 187 1 15
Juan Pierre – CWS 2.84 249 0 14
Drew Stubbs – CIN 2.84 248 1 15
Aramis Ramirez – CHC 2.84 200 0 14
Jhonny Peralta – DET 2.84 184 1 19
Miguel Montero – ARI 2.83 183 0 14
Michael Cuddyer – MIN 2.82 193 0 14
Gaby Sanchez – FLA 2.81 226 0 12
Jamey Carroll – LAD 2.81 208 1 18
Alexei Ramirez – CWS 2.80 234 0 14
Erick Aybar – LAA 2.77 187 1 21
Michael Brantley – CLE 2.76 206 0 14
Josh Willingham – OAK 2.76 195 0 13
Brett Wallace – HOU 2.74 193 0 13
Johnny Damon – TB 2.67 210 0 13
Cliff Pennington – OAK 2.66 192 0 11
Casey McGehee – MIL 2.66 221 0 11
Jimmy Rollins – PHI 2.61 244 0 13
Jay Bruce – CIN 2.61 224 0 10
Miguel Cabrera – DET 2.59 217 1 17
Alex Gordon – KC 2.58 238 0 12
Coco Crisp – OAK 2.58 197 0 10
Ichiro Suzuki – SEA 2.58 237 0 13
Martin Prado – ATL 2.55 252 1 15
Michael Bourn – HOU 2.55 234 0 11
Alex Rodriguez – NYY 2.54 208 0 14
Yadier Molina – STL 2.52 180 0 12
Matt Kemp – LAD 2.52 223 0 12
Carlos Beltran – NYM 2.51 203 0 11
Kurt Suzuki – OAK 2.50 191 0 10
Brian McCann – ATL 2.49 197 0 13
Jonathan Herrera – COL 2.48 178 0 9
Placido Polanco – PHI 2.48 232 0 13
Mitchell Moreland – TEX 2.47 176 0 14
Dan Murphy – NYM 2.47 172 0 12
Alex Gonzalez – ATL 2.46 214 0 11
Matt Holliday – STL 2.42 177 1 17
Marlon Byrd – CHC 2.41 182 1 16
David Ortiz – BOS 2.40 217 0 12
Alfonso Soriano – CHC 2.39 184 0 11
Melky Cabrera – KC 2.38 235 0 10
Ryan Theriot – STL 2.38 205 0 10
Jeff Francoeur – KC 2.38 222 0 10
Alberto Callaspo – LAA 2.37 212 0 12
Asdrubal Cabrera – CLE 2.37 231 0 12
Hunter Pence – HOU 2.36 238 0 13
Darwin Barney – CHC 2.34 206 1 15
Billy Butler – KC 2.32 219 0 10
Jacoby Ellsbury – BOS 2.32 236 1 15
Starlin Castro – CHC 2.30 229 0 13
Denard Span – MIN 2.29 231 0 11
Howie Kendrick – LAA 2.29 196 0 11
Rickie Weeks – MIL 2.29 242 0 9
Brandon Phillips – CIN 2.28 230 0 10
Shane Victorino – PHI 2.27 172 0 11
Jed Lowrie – BOS 2.25 173 0 10
Freddy Sanchez – SF 2.23 213 0 11
Joey Votto – CIN 2.22 237 0 10
Seth Smith – COL 2.20 165 0 10
Robinson Cano – NYY 2.17 214 0 12
Vladimir Guerrero – BAL 2.17 215 0 10
Jose Bautista – TOR 2.16 204 0 10
Ryan Braun – MIL 2.16 230 0 11
Adrian Gonzalez – BOS 2.11 239 0 11
Matthew Joyce – TB 2.11 179 0 11
Michael Young – TEX 2.00 227 0 9
Todd Helton – COL 1.99 169 0 11
Wilson Betemit – KC 1.93 172 0 7
Jason Kubel – MIN 1.86 216 0 8
Jose Reyes – NYM 1.79 241 0 8

NOTE: This stat named SPAM is not affiliated with the fine canned meat products made by the Hormel corporation. But if you’re ever in Austin Minnesota, you should visit the SPAM museum. Also, this stat will not be emailed to you without your consent, as far as I know.

Quentin takes plunk race lead with 10th plunk… and 11th

Tuesday, May 31st, 2011

On August 8, 2008, Jon Lester plunk Carlos Quentin giving Quentin a career total of 35 HBPs. Yesterday, Lester faced Quentin again and delivered his 84th and 85th HBPs. Quentin has now been hit 11 times this season, taking a two plunk lead over Danny Espinosa. Of the last 21 batters who get hit 11 times in their team’s first 56 games, 10 of them have gone on to get hit at least 15 more times by the end of the season, so Quentin has about a 48% chance of breaking the 100 plunk mark this year, based on past experience. Lester is now the all time leader in plunking Carlos Quentin, and the first pitcher to plunk Quentin three times in his career.

The White Sox are now up to 33 HBPs (with Quentin accounting for one third of them), and that leads the majors by a margin of 10 HBPs. They’re on pace fore 95 plunks this year, which would be the most in White Sox history.

The Red Sox have now hit a league high 28 batters, two plunks ahead of the 2nd place Mets.

The Mets didn’t hit anyone yesterday, but Mets batter Justin Turner did get hit by a pitch thrown by Charlie Morton of the Pirates. That ended an un-plunked streak by the Mets that had stretched to 29 games. That was their longest stretch of consecutive games without being hit by a pitch since 1995 when they dodged every pitch in 29 consecutive games from June 20th to July 22nd.

plunk number 74 for Kevin Youkilis

Monday, May 30th, 2011

Only 4 batters got hit by pitches yesterday, but among them was Kevin Youkilis, who extended his Red Sox record plunk total to 74. That means the Red Sox HBP record is now ahead of the Dodgers club record for plunks, in the hierarchy of franchise plunk records. That means that the Red Sox no longer have the weakest HBP record of any of the teams that have been around since 1901.
Here’s the full list of franchise HBP records:
Craig Biggio, HOU (1988-2007) – 285
Jason Kendall, PIT (1996-2004) – 177
Derek Jeter, NYY (1995-2011) – 154
Tommy Tucker, ATL (1890-1897) – 150
Brady Anderson, BAL (1988-2001) – 148
Minnie Minoso, CHW (1951-1980) – 145
Frank Chance, CHC (1898-1912) – 137
Art Fletcher, SFG (1909-1920) – 132
Chase Utley, PHI (2003-2011) – 126
Carlos Delgado, TOR (1993-2004) – 122
Frank Robinson, CIN (1956-1965) – 118
Ron Hunt, WSN (1971-1974) – 114
Bill Freehan, DET (1961-1976) – 114
Brian Downing, ANA (1978-1990) – 105
Bucky Harris, MIN (1919-1928) – 99
Larry Walker, COL (1995-2004) – 98
Geoff Jenkins, MIL (1998-2007) – 95
Jimmie Dykes, OAK (1918-1932) – 93
Edgar Martinez, SEA (1987-2004) – 89
Steve Evans, STL (1909-1913) – 87
Nap Lajoie, CLE (1902-1914) – 79
Mike Macfarlane, KCR (1987-1998) – 78
Kevin Youkilis, BOS (2004-2011) – 74
Zack Wheat, LAD (1909-1926) – 73
Luis Gonzalez, ARI (1999-2006) – 61
Rafael Palmeiro, TEX (1989-2003) – 54
Alex Gonzalez, FLA (1998-2005) – 51
Ron Hunt, NYM (1963-1966) – 41
Carlos Pena, TBD (2007-2010) – 38
Kevin Kouzmanoff, SDP (2007-2009) – 36

Alex Gonzalez, who still holds the Marlins HBP record, was also plunked yesterday, giving him a career total of 74 – but he’s playing for Atlanta this year.

Chase Utley gets 126th hbp

Saturday, May 28th, 2011

Chase Utley is back, and he’s doing what he does best. Getting hit by pitches. Utley took his 126th career plunk last night, on a pitch from Mets thrower Chris Capuano. That moves him into sole possession of 40th place on the all time list, ahead of Jeff Kent and Honus Wagner. Utley has been plunked 16 times by the Mets, which leads all active batters in getting plunked by that team. Utley has now been hit 6 times by pitchers named Chris, which ties Craig Biggio and Melvin Mora for the Designated Hitter Era record for plunks against pitchers named Chris. The Mets are now back in a tie with the Red Sox in the race to see what team can hit the most batters in 2011.

Vlad Guerrero got his 99th HBP yesterday, on a Gio Gonzalez pitch. He’s now tied for 70th place on the all time list, and one plunk away from being the 70th member of the 100 plunk club.

Mark Ellis got hit by Chris Tillman, and that made Ellis the 12th batter to get hit by 50 pitches for the A’s in franchise history. He’s also the first batter born in South Dakota to get to the half-century mark in HBPs.

Plunk rates by foul balls allowed

Friday, May 27th, 2011

There’s been a trend for a while now, that batters like to “work the pitch count”, and hit a lot of foul balls to tire out the opposing pitcher. It might not be a real trend – it might just be something baseball announcers like to talk about, or praise a batter for “battling”, and taking a lot of pitches in a plate appearance. Or, it might just be clever marketing by the guys who buy ad space on those scrolling signs behind home plate. They probably slip a few bucks Dustin Pedroia to foul off a lot of pitches so their sign will stay on TV longer. But anyway, it kind of makes you wonder if hitting a lot of foul balls does anybody any good… and in my case, it makes me wonder if pitchers who give up a lot of foul balls are more likely to plunk someone.

On the plunk rate thing, the results are inconclusive – here are the HBP rates groups by the number of foul balls the pitcher had given up so far in that game, at the time of the HBP. (For 2011 game data, through May 26)

Fouls PA per HBP Total PA
0 to 4 112.2 26477
5 to 9 135.7 13570
10 to 14 127.8 9327
15 to 20 132.0 5015
21 to 25 131.1 1835
26 to 30 125.0 375
31 to 35 N/A 65
35 to 40 N/A 2

So… they hit batters the most before they’ve given up 5 foul balls, and then… well there’s not exactly a clear trend there, but it’s all pretty close. I think we can safely say that at least this year, hitting a lot of foul balls off a pitcher doesn’t make that pitcher more likely to hit someone. The total HBP rate this year is one plunk per 122.1 batters, at the moment.

But what about individual batters? Do all their foul balls get annoying and make the batter hit them as the game goes on? Here are the rates by the batters total fouls hit during the game:

Fouls PA per HBP Total PA
0 126.6 17217
1 117.7 14471
2 119.3 10258
3 94.3 6411
4 172.0 3784
5 108.4 2167
6 378.4 1135
7 312.5 625
8 151.0 302
9 147.0 147
10 or more 149.0 149

It looks like hitting 3 foul balls will increase your likelihood of getting an HBP, but any fouls you hit after that are going to make you fairly unlikely to be plunked.

While we’re at this, how does that work for fouls in a single plate appearance? Here are the rates base on the foul balls hit in each plate appearance:

Fouls PA per HBP Total PA
0 121.3 32377
1 115.5 15128
2 112.6 6078
3 291.0 2037
4 171.0 684
5 243.0 243
6 or more 0.0 119

So a batter with three foul balls in a plate appearance gets hit once per 291 times, but a batter with three foul balls hit in the game gets hit once every 94.3 plate appearance… kind of makes you think there might not be any connection at all between these stats… but lets brush that aside.

And now, here’s the batting stats other people might care about. Below are the popular offensive numbers, grouped by number of foul balls hit in the plate appearance.

Fouls PA OBP SLG AVG OPS PA per HR
0 32377 .350 .447 .285 .797 37.10
1 15128 .287 .330 .219 .616 55.00
2 6078 .255 .268 .179 .523 65.40
3 2037 .265 .285 .178 .550 56.60
4 684 .297 .277 .181 .574 57.00
5 243 .346 .354 .212 .699 48.60
6 or more 119 .294 .337 .192 .631 29.80

Of course the problem with hitting a lot of foul balls, is that the batter is spending a lot of time in 2-strike counts, so it kind of makes sense that hitting a lot fouls is not healthy for your offensive numbers. If you’ve already hit two foul balls (or have two strikes) you can help your cause a little bit by fouling off a couple of more pitches – but you’re not going to help it much. If you can get from 2 fouls to 5 fouls you can pull that situational OPS up from .523 to .699. And that’s only a few points below the league average.

Oh right, but the benefit of hitting lots of fouls is supposed to be evident later in the game when you’ve worn the pitcher down. Lets see how well that works – Here’s the opponents batting numbers based on the number of fouls a pitcher gives up in a game:

Fouls PA OBP SLG AVG OPS PA per HR
0 to 4 26477 .326 .381 .251 .707 46.50
5 to 9 13570 .314 .391 .247 .705 41.80
10 to 14 9327 .310 .397 .249 .707 38.70
15 to 20 5015 .318 .384 .252 .702 50.70
21 to 25 1835 .310 .402 .249 .712 38.20
26 to 30 375 .323 .465 .282 .788 31.30
31 to 35 65 .200 .323 .161 .523 21.70
35 to 40 2 .500 .500 .500 1.000 N/A

If you take a look at that table of numbers, you’ll notice… that they pretty much don’t change. Look at the OPS column – it barely changes until you get into the tiny sample sizes. The overall league OPS this year is .707, and the opponents OPS based on the number of foul balls the pitcher has given up barely moves from that number. So what’s that supposed to mean, that managers are just SO good at watching pitchers pitch counts that they pull them out before they give up so many foul balls that they start to struggle?

If anyone is getting tired and starting to struggle after all these fouls, it looks more like it’s the batters.
Here are the batters offensive numbers, split by the number of foul balls they’ve hit in the game:

Fouls PA OBP SLG AVG OPS PA per HR
0 17217 .343 .441 .281 .784 37.00
1 14471 .311 .375 .245 .685 46.80
2 10258 .308 .371 .237 .679 42.00
3 6411 .311 .354 .233 .665 52.10
4 3784 .289 .331 .217 .620 58.20
5 2167 .333 .378 .238 .711 45.10
6 1135 .301 .326 .221 .628 59.70
7 625 .306 .368 .230 .674 N/A
8 302 .325 .338 .241 .663 N/A
9 147 .231 .242 .152 .474 N/A
10 or more 149 .295 .290 .198 .585 N/A

Here are the league leaders this year, in unnecessarily tiring themselves out by hitting so many foul balls:

Batter Total Fouls Fouls with 2 strikes
Dustin Pedroia 194 94
Jeff Francoeur 183 68
Brandon Phillips 181 62
Melky Cabrera 177 58
Paul Konerko 174 72
Neil Walker 170 64
Drew Stubbs 169 65
Torii Hunter 165 67
Curtis Granderson 164 78
Hunter Pence 163 62
Daric Barton 162 81
Adam Jones 161 66
Jason Kubel 158 70
Dexter Fowler 158 57
Aubrey Huff 157 53
James Loney 157 50
Johnny Damon 156 56
Frederick Freeman 154 62
Ichiro Suzuki 154 55
Cliff Pennington 153 77
Alex Gordon 153 60
Matt Kemp 153 60
Adrian Gonzalez 153 44
Jay Bruce 153 47
Joey Votto 151 60

Quentin gets 83rd – 9th of the season

Friday, May 27th, 2011

Only three batters got hit by pitches yesterday, but one of them was Carlos Quentin, so that’s always notable. That was the 83rd of his career, and his 9th this year, which makes him the to American League HBP man, and he’s tied with Danny Espinosa for the Major Leauge lead. Quentin is rolling along at a rate of one plunk every 25.9 plate appearances for his career, the highest active plunk rate in the majors for anyone with more than 2 HBPs. Brandon Morrow threw that one.
Gordon Beckham was also plunked in that game, and scored and insurance run in the 9th inning to help the White Sox win 3-1. The White Sox have now been hit a major league leading 30 times this year.
The other plunk yesterday was in the Indians/Red Sox game where Alfredo Aceves hit Brennan Boesch. Aceves has now hit 10 batters in his career, and he’s the first pitcher named Alfredo to hit double digits in plunks. The Red Sox have now hit 26 batters, and that’s the most of any major league team this year, one ahead of the Mets.

Rolen gets 123rd in the 19th inning

Thursday, May 26th, 2011

Wilson Valdez had never hit a batter before, and Scott Rolen had been hit by 122 pitches when they met last in the top of the 19th inning. No Reds batter since the invention of “divisions” in baseball had ever been hit as late as the 19th inning of a game… but when you get to 19 innings without the game ending, you have to try new things. So Valdez hit Rolen. It didn’t really help getting the game over with, but it did move Rolen one plunk closer to the HBP all time top 40. He’s 43rd, and needs two more to tie Honus Wagner, Jeff Kent and Chase Utley for 40th place (though Utley could move up by the time Rolen gets there).

Brandon Phillips got his 44th career HBP last night, and that ties him with Wes Helms for the 2nd most plunks ever recorded by a player born in North Carolina. Ray Durham holds the North Carolina record with 72.

Reed Johnson got his 108th hbp, tying him with Mo Vaughn and Bill Joyce at 58th place on the all time list. He has 6 this season, even though he only has 69 plate appearances.

172 for Giambi

Wednesday, May 25th, 2011

Jason Giambi bats left handed, and he’s now been hit by 172 pitches. The only other player who can say that, and who was born after Ulysses S Grant was president, is Carlos Delgado, who was also hit by 172 pitches. Giambi is now tied with Delgado for 13th place on the all time list, and 2nd place all time among left handed batters. Joe Saunders delivered the latest of Giambi’s many HBPs, and it was the third time he has plunked Giambi, even though he’s only hit every other player in the league 17 times.

Livan Hernandez plunked Prince Fielder last night, giving Fielder his 74th career plunk. For Hernandez, it was number 73 of his career, and his 40th with the Nationals. That ties him with Bill Stoneman for 4th place on that franchise’s all time plunks list. Hernandez became the first Cuban to plunk Prince Fielder. Also in the game Mike McClendon threw his first major league plunk, hitting Jason Werth.

The Mets have gone 24 consecutive games without getting hit by a pitch, there longest streak since 1995, but Taylor Buchholz became the 297th pitcher to throw a plunk for the team. He hit Aramis Ramirez, giving him his 50th plunk as a Cub. Overall, Ramirez has 82 career HBPs.

Quick Recoveries: Offensive production the day after a plunk

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

Sometimes those things swell up, you know. But here’s a look at who’s been the best at putting up offensive numbers one day after being hit by a pitch, for the time period from the beginning of 2005 through May 23, 2011.

First, HBPs the day after an HBP (since 2005):
Rickie Weeks – 13
Carlos Quentin – 10
Chase Utley – 10
Jose Guillen – 10
Ryan Garko – 9
David DeJesus – 8
Aaron Rowand – 8
Reed Johnson – 7
Alex Rodriguez – 5
Carlos Delgado – 5
Travis Hafner – 5
David Eckstein – 5
Marlon Byrd – 5
Jason Kendall – 5
Juan Pierre – 5
Lastings Milledge – 5
Jeff Francoeur – 5

Hits the day after an HBP:
Chase Utley – 108
Aaron Rowand – 74
Alex Rodriguez – 70
Carlos Quentin – 68
David DeJesus – 64
David Eckstein – 64
Matt Holliday – 64
Miguel Tejada – 60
Rickie Weeks – 59
Jason Kendall – 57
Kevin Youkilis – 55
Mark Teixeira – 55
Prince Fielder – 54
Derek Jeter – 54
Carlos Delgado – 52
Jose Guillen – 51

OPS the day after an HBP (100 AB minimum):
Paul Konerko – 1.114
Carlos Pena – 1.058
Alex Rodriguez – 1.033
Adam Dunn – 1.031
Carlos Delgado – 1.015
Matt Holliday – 1.002
Carlos Quentin – .995
Kevin Youkilis – .985
Prince Fielder – .955
Mark Teixeira – .951
Andruw Jones – .945
Vladimir Guerrero – .938
Manny Ramirez – .925
Chase Utley – .914
Casey Blake – .906
Jason Bay – .903
Edwin Encarnacion – .900
Travis Hafner – .897
Ryan Braun – .877
Dan Uggla – .874
Albert Pujols – .867
David DeJesus – .844
Aramis Ramirez – .841
Ryan Garko – .839
Scott Rolen – .839

Home Runs the day after an HBP:
Alex Rodriguez – 21
Prince Fielder – 18
Chase Utley – 15
Mark Teixeira – 13
Paul Konerko – 12
Ryan Howard – 12
Carlos Quentin – 12
Rickie Weeks – 12
Casey Blake – 11
Carlos Pena – 10
Adam Dunn – 10
Matt Holliday – 9
Andruw Jones – 9
Jason Bay – 9
Aaron Rowand – 9
Kevin Youkilis – 8
Kevin Kouzmanoff – 8
Josh Willingham – 8
Carlos Delgado – 7
Cody Ross – 7
Manny Ramirez – 7
Dan Uggla – 7
Aramis Ramirez – 7

Record Retraction

Tuesday, May 24th, 2011

One of the things I used to be able to count on in the world of HBP stats was that nobody could agree on the plunk totals of most of the pitchers who played before 1910 or so. That always bothered me, but since there were so many different opinions available, I always figured I could just go with the numbers that were most convenient to me – which were the numbers from the Lahman database, for those of you who keep track of this sort of thing. A few years ago, most of those numbers agreed with what showed up on Retrosheet.org, which I consider to be the most believable source for such things. But, sometime between when I last checked and now, retrosheet went and started to agree with the MLB.com totals for those old timey pitchers, which makes sense because you’d think MLB.com would know about these things. And because of that, I’m now working on changing the data I have to match retrosheet.org, and baseball-reference.com and mlb.com for old timey pitching totals.
And, because of THAT – I have to point out that Kerry Wood and Carlos Zambrano can no longer be considered the holders of the Cubs record for hit batters. Because Clark Griffith hit 116 batters for the Cubs between 1893 and 1900. This makes some of the plunks last weekend a bit less exciting, because Carlos Zambrano was only breaking the “modern” cubs record for hit batters when he hit Youkilis to give him the all time Red Sox record.